Brexit: All Eyes on “Super Saturday”

After a week of intense negotiations, the British government and the European Union yesterday formalized a new Brexit agreement that will allow the UK to leave the EU on October 31. However, the new agreement has to be approved by the British Parliament for the process to proceed. Prime Minister Boris Johnson has until Saturday to convince his party’s Eurosceptics, Northern Ireland Unionists, and opposition members to vote for the deal. None are so far keen on endorsing it.

Brexit: EU and UK Agree on New Deal

The European Union and the UK negotiating teams have reached an agreement for Britain to leave the EU at a meeting in Brussels. “We’ve got a great new deal that takes back control— now Parliament should get Brexit done on Saturday so we can move on to other priorities like the cost of living, the NHS, violent crime, and our environment,”  Prime Minister Boris Johnson said in a tweet.

Johnson Tells EU He has No Intention of Postponing Brexit

The debate in the UK was re-heated when Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced today that he would tell European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker that he wants to reach an agreement on Brexit, but he does not intend to postpone the October 31 deadline for Brexit. Political commentators began to ask whether Johnson’s remarks meant that he would not recognize the law adopted by Parliament. Last week, the Parliament passed a law asking Johnson to postpone Brexit for three months if an agreement could not be reached by October 19th.

House of Commons, Again, Rejects Johnson’s Call for Snap Election

The House of Commons voted for the second time to reject the government’s request for early general elections.The vote comes on the last day of Parliament’s work before a five-week suspension, at the request of the government, until October 14. Members of Parliament will have no further opportunity to vote on any early elections until the end of the suspension period, which means that elections cannot be held until at least late November.

British Government Seeks ‘Parliamentary Suspension’ – Queen Elizabeth Agrees

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s government plans to suspend British parliamentarians by blocking the British parliament and its plan to leave the EU. Mr. Johnson, who has recently been elected leader of the Conservative Party and is prime minister, met with Queen Elizabeth II, to convene a special royal council and issue a renewal order.  The EU’s deadline for Britain to make a final decision on leaving the EU on October 31.

Brexit Cold Hard Facts – The Pros and Cons

Brexit is the withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union, after the referendum held on 23 June 2016.  The HBO documentary Brexit depicts the behind the scenes experience of the referendum. The UK is a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary system of governance that is based off of the Westminster system. Executive power rests in the hands of Her Majesty’s Government, the prime minister and the cabinet who are all members of the Privy Council. Legislative power is held within the bicameral parliament, the House of Commons and the House of Lords, the former being elected and the later appointed.

Johnson “Very, Very Worried” About China-US Trade War

France hosted the G7 summit in Biarritz from August 24th to 26th, 2019. Although China did not participate, and the China-US trade war is not an issue, it is an unavoidable topic. Only seven Western countries (and the European Union representing Europe) are present, but the group discussed pressing issues, such as the global economy, climate change, Libya, Iran, terrorism and immigration issues.

UK Now Threatens to Close Its Borders Immediately After Brexit

Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Monday implored Germany and France to pave the way for a Brexit compromise, while again reassuring that the UK was ready to leave the European Union without an agreement on 31st October. Johnson’s government said Monday that it would “immediately” end the free movement of people in case of a Brexit without agreement on 31st October, a rather hard position compared to the one from the previous regime.

Tories Lose By-Election, Boris’ Majority Reduced to One

After less than two weeks in office, Boris Johnson appears to have failed his first electoral test as Britain’s Prime Minister.  Welsh Liberal Democrat leader Jane Dodds won the Brecon and Radnorshire by-election on Thursday, defeating embattled Tory incumbent Christopher Davies by 1,425 votes, and cutting the government’s majority in the Commons to just one.  That includes the Conservative Party’s shotgun partners from Ulster, the Democratic Unionist Party.  With fears of a no-deal Brexit very real, and very much back on the table, that number could shrink even further by the end of the week.

British Prime Minister Announces Investments of 329 Million Euros in Scotland

British Prime Minister, Boris Johnson on Monday doubled an offensive to boost his Brexit goals. On the one part, he announced an investment plan of 300 million pounds (329 million euros) in Scotland, a territory mostly contrary to an EU exit, especially without a pact. On the other hand, the conservative leader’s office sent a harsh message to the EU, warning that Johnson will not negotiate with Brussels if the safeguard included in the exit agreement is not withdrawn before avoiding a hard border in Ireland.

No-deal Brexit: London Accelerates Preparations of an EU Exit Without Agreement

The new British Government “is working with the assumption of a Brexit without agreement,” reiterated Michael Gove, responsible for exploring, if possible, a negotiation with Brussels but, above all, supervising the preparations for an exit from the EU. This was stated by the Prime Minister, Boris Johnson, during his inauguration and his deputy has ratified it in a platform published  in The Sunday Times: “The no-deal (no agreement)  is now a very real perspective.”

Boris Johnson a Step Away From Becoming Britain’s Prime Minister

Turbulent months are expected in the European Union (EU) with Great Britain. It is likely that the day after tomorrow, Boris Johnson will become the new British prime minister, and with his coming to power there is a complicated panorama for the bloc: a Brexit without agreement or a new postponement.

Conservatives who govern Britain will announce tomorrow who will be the new party leader, replacing Theresa May. The chosen one will automatically become prime minister the next day. A little more than three months later, on October 31, Britain is expected to leave the European Union (EU).

British Police Launch Investigation of Kim Darroch Memos Leak

British police have launched an investigation into an alleged leak of e-mails from the British ambassador in Washington criticizing the administration of US President Donald Trump. Deputy police commissioner Neil Basu said there was “clear public interest” in bringing officials to justice. Sir Kim Darroch resigned as an ambassador on Wednesday, saying it was “not possible” for him to continue.

Boris Johnson vs. Jeremy Hunt for PM: Winner Gets the Mess

And then there were two.  The race to replace Theresa May as leader of the Conservative and Unionist Party, and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, is down to its final candidates.  Heavily-favored Boris Johnson will face the surprising Jeremy Hunt, who took Johnson’s job as Foreign Secretary when he resigned in protest of May’s Brexit deal.  The winner will be decided by the party’s 160,000 grassroots members some time late next month.  It is a contrast in styles, abilities, and Brexit itself.

Britons Back Boris to Deliver Brexit, Beat Brexit

The race for arguably the least-desirable job in global politics may be turning in to a cakewalk. Boris Johnson, former London Mayor, Foreign Secretary, and current brash Brexiteer, appears to be cruising to 10 Downing Street, to succeed Theresa May as leader of the Conservative Party and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. Johnson easily topped his rivals in the first round of voting among Tory MPs Thursday. Eventually, all but two candidates will be eliminated, giving the party’s 160,000 faithful the final choice. As is typically the case in electoral politics, winning the job will be the easy part.

In Like a Lion, Out Like a Lamb: The End of May

Early Friday morning, outside the steps of 10 Downing Street, Theresa May brought the unmitigated disaster of her premiership to an abrupt and ignoble end. Three years ago, the day after 52% of Britons voted for divorce from the European Union, May inherited a deeply divided populace, a disintegrating political party, and a country flung into chaos by its own hand. By every measurable metric, she has left the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the Conservative and Unionist Party with it, in a worse state than when she found it.