Is the Senate Really Broken? Or is History Repeating Itself?

What is the purpose of the United States Senate?  During a supposed breakfast meeting between founding fathers, Thomas Jefferson was said to have asked why George Washington agreed to the creation of a second, superfluous house of Congress.  Washington himself replied with a question: “why did you just now pour that coffee into your saucer, before drinking?”  Jefferson answered, “to cool it.”  Washington thus answered Jefferson’s query, “even so, we pour our legislation into the senatorial saucer to cool it.”   More than a century later, George Frisbie Hoar described the legislative body in which he served as a place where “the deliberate will, the sober second thought of the people might find expression.”

Decision Season Starts at the Supreme Court

Late spring is decision season on the Supreme Court, and for judicial watchers, Monday morning did not disappoint. The Court issued three decisions, on seemingly minor issues, which could have larger reverberations across the country. If tradition is any guide, more contentious and newsworthy decisions await in mid-June.

In the decision you had to search legal blogs to find, the Court unanimously expanded the time available to private parties to bring whistleblower suits under the False Claims Act. In Cochise Consultancy Inc. v. United States, the Court ruled that such a party, called a relator, could rely on a second statute of limitations in a suit in which the U.S. has declined to intervene.

50-48: Senate Confirms Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court