Hong Kong Government Apologizes to Muslim Community for Spraying Mosque

The government of Hong Kong apologized Monday to the region’s Muslim leaders after riot police sprayed a mosque gate and some people with a water cannon as authorities tried to disperse rowdy protesters on Sunday. Chief Executive Carrie Lam and the police chief visited the Kowloon Mosque to apologize to Muslim community leaders, religious officials told news reporters.

Hong Kong Leader Cancels Speech After Chaos in LegCo

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam was forced to read her annual speech via video after protests from pro-democracy legislators. They reportedly shouted and mocked Lam in the middle of the speech. Lam is being pressured by protests against Chinese intervention which had taken place four months ago. In her speech, she promised to remain committed to restoring trust in the government and asking people to “put aside differences.”

Hong Kong Police Arrest More as “Lady Liberty” Looks On

Hong Kong police carried out new arrests during protests on Sunday, organized in different neighborhoods by pro-democracy protesters. Security forces stormed a shopping center which protesters had vandalized for supporting the pro-Beijing Hong Kong government. On the other hand, a group of protesters secretly transported a statue that became a symbol of their mobilization on top of an emblematic mountain of the ex-British colony, the “Lion Rock” (495 meters), which dominates the peninsula from Kowloon.

Hong Kong Court Rejects Challenge to Mask Ban— Protesters Return in Masks

Tens of thousands of protesters flooded Hong Kong Sunday against a ban on wearing masks in public. Hong Kong’s Supreme Court dismissed a challenge to the ban by pro-democracy legislators. The ban, decreed by Chief Executive Carrie Lam, came into effect on Saturday in an apparent bid to halt the protests that have been going on for four months. Instead, the move has sparked even more clashes and destruction over the last two days in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory.

Hong Kong: Protests Scheduled Before Chinese National Day

Pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong have set themselves a busy schedule for Saturday, Sept. 28, according to Reuters. These schedules include restoring the “Lennon Walls” and celebrating the fifth anniversary of the Golden Umbrella movement. Thousands of protesters gathered in the harbor area on Friday, chanting slogans accusing police brutality of protesters for more than three months of unrest in Hong Kong.

General Strike in Hong Kong; Beijing Waits, for Now

Hong Kongers from all walks of life, and seven districts of the city, took to the streets Monday as part of a general strike, the largest such demonstration since 1967.  Teachers and students, aviation workers, finance employees, and civil servants took part in the protests, aimed at both Hong Kong’s pro-Beijing government and mainland China itself.  What initially began as a row over a now-suspended extradition bill has morphed in to a movement against Chinese encroachment, Hong Kong’s non-democratic system, and its unaccountable police force.  Now in their ninth week, and showing no signs of slowing down, some fear Beijing may be compelled to act.

Up to a Million Protest Hong Kong Extradition Bill

Hundreds of thousands, and perhaps up to one million people jammed the streets of Hong Kong on Sunday to protest amendments by the Legislative Council, which would allow the extradition of those accused of crimes to mainland China. Opponents believe the bill will allow the communist regime to target political opponents, whether living in or visiting Hong Kong, and threaten the city’s longstanding autonomy. Beijing is said to want the bill “urgently,” and the LegCo pledged to press on regardless.