Looking at the COVID-19 Pandemic and the Real Estate Industry

The coronavirus pandemic has had a massive impact on the entirety of the glow. To this point, nearly every corner of the Earth has been impacted by it. In addition to a drastic public health crisis that has led to millions of cases and hundreds of thousands of deaths, a significant economic crisis has been created as well. Countless people have lost their jobs, many small businesses have been forced to close their doors for good, and there are numerous families that are struggling to make ends meet. Therefore, it is important to take a look at one of the biggest sectors of the economy and how it has been impacted, which is the real estate industry.

The Uncertainty in the Current Job Market

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted everyone and there are countless people who are wondering how they are going to be able to make ends meet. Even though many businesses have started to reopen, there are still countless countries that are struggling to contain the virus, including both the United States and Israel. It is important to look at why the job market is so uncertain and what this means for the future moving forward. Some of the major reasons why there is so much uncertainty with respect to the job market include:

CDC is Coronavirus Testing Your Dog and Cat

Department of health teams are visiting homes to test your dogs and cats for coronavirus. Texas scientists have reported finding two pet cats with the coronavirus — the first in the state. Cats were swabbed as part of a study being conducted at Texas A&M University to understand how pets living in “high-risk” households may be impacted by COVID-19.

National Mask Exemption Awareness Day™ (MEADAY104)

It seems all we hear these days in #COVIDWORLD is mask this or mask that.  The CDC recommends them. Dr. Fauci recommends them. Governors and mayors have mandated them, and a large number of citizens are wearing them.  But amid all of this recommending and mandating, has anyone or entity really stopped to think and implement practical strategy for our most vulnerable and underserved population during this pandemic-the mask-exempt. 

Chinese University Students Confined Since Back At College

Covid-19 continues to be rampant in many countries, except where it broke out first: China. According to the latest statistics, on September 18, there were only 18 new confirmed patients, all travelers from other countries. Even so, the Chinese government is extremely careful with these imported cases. On September 13, in Ruili, two illegal travelers from Myanmar were reported to be infected. The next day, the local government quarantined the entire city and started to carry out massive PCR testing. In just three days, they’ve already completed 95,362 tests (all negative), and more underway.

Pandemic Hunger Pangs

The pandemic has completely upended lives across the planet, restricting movement, shutting schools and forcing millions to work from home.Being cooped up at home with an immense amount of downtime means tending to the bottomless pit called stomach.  Snacking and family meals increase; family members search for a new snack to devour every few hours. Eating food affects an individual’s levels of dopamine—a neurotransmitter in the brain that plays a major role in reward-motivated behavior. To put it simply, dopamine is the brain’s “desire” chemical associated with the feeling you get when achieving a goal.

Labor Day Weekend – Is Covid-19 Worry Warranted?

Labor Day marks the unofficial end of summer. California is again hit by a dangerous and potentially historic heat wave. Extreme heat will significantly increase the risk for heat related illnesses, and could become deadly, particularly for those working or participating in outdoor activities. But crowds packed beaches as California baked in the scorching sun. “Every heat wave could have that potential to be deadly,” said Eric Boldt of the National Weather Service. “And this one in particular because it is so hot. We’re talking about possibly all-time records and that goes back over 100 years.”