IRS Opens 2019 Tax Filing Season for Individual Filers on Jan. 27

The Internal Revenue Service confirmed that the nation’s tax season will start for individual tax return filers on Monday, Jan. 27, 2020, when the tax agency will begin accepting and processing 2019 tax year returns.

The deadline to file 2019 tax returns and pay any tax owed is Wednesday, April 15, 2020. More than 150 million individual tax returns for the 2019 tax year are expected to be filed, with the vast majority of those coming before the traditional April tax deadline.

Get Ready for Taxes: What to Do Before the New Year

The Internal Revenue Service reminds taxpayers there are things that you can do now to get ready for the tax-filing season ahead.

Charitable Contributions

For most taxpayers, Dec. 31 is the last day to take actions that will impact their 2019 tax return. For example, those who plan to itemize deductions should know that charitable contributions are deductible in the year made. Donations charged to a credit card before the end of 2019 count for the 2019 tax year, even if the bill isn’t paid until 2020. Checks to a charity count for 2019 if they are mailed by the last day of the year.

Giving Tuesday ‘Tis the Season Tax Tips when Donating

Giving Tuesday is an annual event celebrated the week after Thanksgiving to kick off the season of charitable giving.  During this traditional day of giving generously to charities, friends and family, it is important to remember that your donations can have a major impact on the tax return you’ll file in the New Year. Here are some “Season of Giving” tips from the IRS covering everything from charity donations to refund planning:

Cyber Monday Shopping List Should Include Safeguards Against Online Thieves

For many shoppers, Cyber Monday kicks off the holiday season. For some online thieves, ‘tis the season to take advantage of having so many people shop online at once. They steal shoppers’ personal information and package it as their own, while draining bank accounts or saving the information to file fraudulent tax returns in the names of the victims at the start of the 2020 filing season.

“Or Else What?” The Limits of Checks and Balances

America’s founding fathers were wise in many respects. They were revolutionary in setting up a republic, based on the separation of powers and a system of checks and balances. One even presciently warned against the mischief of factions. What they did not foresee was two nationalized factions paralyzing government, a viable means of resolving disputes between elections, and an answer to “or else what?” should one branch refuse to comply with the demands of the other.

Do You Have an IRS Audit Coming?

Shut Down Continues with No End in Sight