Mexico Condemns “Astonishing” SCOTUS Ruling on Asylum

Mexico regretted that the Supreme Court of the United States gave the green light to new restrictions on asylum promoted by the administration of President Donald Trump. The regulations directly affect the Latin American country because all applicants who have passed through their territory could not request protection on US soil unless they have done so in Mexico, or another nation, first.

Supreme Court Sides with Trump, Delivering Big Victory on the Wall

In a surprise decision late Friday, the Supreme Court struck down a lower court ruling, 5-4, against President Trump’s declaration of an emergency on the border with Mexico.  The ruling clears the way for Trump to redirect $2.5 billion from the Pentagon to build his long-promised border wall.  The ultimate issue is still to be decided by the courts, but Friday’s decision allows the money to be spent now.  It follows a scathing report this week, from the Washington Examiner, that despite the central promise of his campaign, Trump had not built a single mile of new border fence since assuming office.

Does Racism Still Exist? Do We Still Need Affirmative Action?

Merriam-Webster’s dictionary defines racism as “racial prejudice or discrimination.” There are thousands of scholarships available exclusively for African-Americans, Latino Americans, or Arab Americans. And while it is true that every few years someone attempts to start a very minor scholarship for Caucasians only, these scholarships often become defunct and quickly fall under intense scrutiny for being racist or for promoting white supremacy.

“Are You an American Citizen?” How a Simple Question Can Cause so Much Controversy

“Are you an American citizen?” Although this question seems simple, it is surrounded by controversy. The most recent of which comes from a Supreme Court case involving adding an additional question to the Census. This question would ask American residents if they are citizens. Despite the conservative lean of the court, they delayed the president’s action, perhaps long enough to keep it off the 2020 Census. The court claimed that the White House’s explanation for adding the question was insufficient. They felt that President’s reason was “more of a distraction” than an explanation.

Supreme Court Upholds Cross on Public Land in Maryland – Decision Needs Strengthening

A 40 foot World War I memorial cross can continue to stand on public ground in Maryland, the Supreme Court ruled Thursday in an important 7-2 decision about the use of religious symbols in American life.

The judges said preserving a long-standing religious monument is very different from building a new one. The court said that this doesn’t violate the constitutional prohibition on the government favoring one religion over others.

SCOTUS Roundup: Calm Monday Leaves Chaotic Work Ahead

Call it the calm before the storm. After another relatively quiet Monday, the Supreme Court adjourned for the week, leaving its most divisive work for another time. The Court did decide three cases, two of them by unanimous decision, and rejected others. More than two dozen cases remain over the Court’s final three weeks, setting the stage for a potentially explosive finish.

Punt, Pass, and Kick: Tuesday at the Supreme Court

These days, the Supreme Court is in the news as much for what it does not do as what it does do. On Tuesday, the Court did not hear an appeal to an abortion case, but did strike down a state restriction on the practice, yet not the whole law. They also did not intervene in a case involving transgender students, or comment why, leaving another lower court ruling in place. However, the Court did issue a decisive ruling in favor of law enforcement in a free speech case. The decisions may offer guidance to Court watchers as to what justices may do this term and next.

Decision Season Starts at the Supreme Court

Late spring is decision season on the Supreme Court, and for judicial watchers, Monday morning did not disappoint. The Court issued three decisions, on seemingly minor issues, which could have larger reverberations across the country. If tradition is any guide, more contentious and newsworthy decisions await in mid-June.

In the decision you had to search legal blogs to find, the Court unanimously expanded the time available to private parties to bring whistleblower suits under the False Claims Act. In Cochise Consultancy Inc. v. United States, the Court ruled that such a party, called a relator, could rely on a second statute of limitations in a suit in which the U.S. has declined to intervene.

50-48: Senate Confirms Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court