Things You Didn’t Know Authors Struggle With

  • The struggle is knowing when it is time to close the laptop, put the pen down, and do your daily duties like shower, cook, or clean.
  • Everyone is different, but learning how to channel those waves of inspiration can be the key to writing that one novel that sells over a million copies.
  • Just remember to keep your circle small and let everyone else be a fan of your work.

Managing Proper Work Hours: When you are in the middle of your novel and things are starting to pick up, your adrenaline can start rushing through your fingers. It’s the same feeling authors hope is transferred over to their readers when the novel is finished. The struggle is knowing when it is time to close the laptop, put the pen down, and do your daily duties like shower, cook, or clean. It’s easy to get pulled into your book that you are reading or writing. It is hard to come back to reality. If you are a reader, you have to set the book down and wonder what is going to happen until you pick the book up again. If you are a author, when you close the laptop to pick your children up from school, you are constantly thinking about your characters and where the story is going to go. You are completely in control of your world and based on the way you are feeling/thinking that day your story can go in any direction.

Overwhelming Amounts Of Inspiration: Even though it sounds like a great thing, it can be difficult to manage all of your ideas and visions when the creative juices are flowing throughout your brain. Rather it’s ideas for a new series, sequel, or something that has nothing to do with your current project. It is very easy to lose your notes, forget what they mean, or just disregard them as irrelevant. I know for me, I made a 2019 goal chart in December with a few different books/series on it and here I am in the middle of February, I have completely dropped half of those ideas and started something new that wasn’t even in my, “one day I will do this” list. Everyone is different, but learning how to channel those waves of inspiration can be the key to writing that one novel that sells over a million copies.

Denial, Denial, Denial: Not everyone shares your vision and that’s OK, but it can be hard to maintain a positive attitude when so much negativity is rushing at you like an angry bull. It is easy to tell people to shake it off and move on, it is a lot harder to actually do that. Denial comes from everywhere when you are an author. You can think that killing a certain character in your book is the way to go, but your accountability partners and associates might all rebel against you if you do. When your book is finished you now have the responsibility of selling it and getting it in as many hands as possible. You would like to think you could count on your family and friends to buy a copy regardless of the content, but it doesn’t always work that way. Then there is the struggle of finding a literary agent, you can get lost looking for the agent that just feels right for you. There are so many of them out there and all of them are only looking for specific genres of books. Once you find one that seems like they share your vision, you have to send them a query letter and wait to see if they want to represent you. The problem with this is most of the industry subscribes to the idea that a “no response = a pass on your work” in my personal opinion being left to wonder what someone thinks about your creation is worse than a courtesy e-mail that reads “I’m sorry I’m just not looking for this type of novel at this time.”

Keeping Your Circle Tight: When you are writing your book it is an exciting thing. It is hard to contain all of the butterflies. It really is natural to be proud of something and share it with everyone, but it’s important to write the story you see in your head. The more people know about the story, characters, and plot the less excitement they will have about the book when it comes out or the more you will let their opinions alter your vision. Being stuck with “writer’s block” and bouncing ideas off of your associates to help you push through your roadblock is one thing, but voluntarily giving away critical moments, character developments to too many people can present many problems for you. Just remember to keep your circle small and let everyone else be a fan of your work.

Kyle Headlee

Kyle Rae Headlee is the author of Dream Chooser Series, his goal is to use stories of kids with less than ideal circumstances to inspire the youth of the nation to never give up on their dreams.
https://dreamchooser.webnode.com

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