Trump Fires Krebs, Election Security Official

  • “Effective immediately, Chris Krebs has been terminated as Director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency.”
  • Krebs has managed the Department of Homeland Security's Cyber ​​and Infrastructure Security Agency since its inception two years ago.
  • “There is no evidence that any voting system deleted or lost votes, changed votes, or was in any way compromised,” the officials emphasized.

In a move seen as retaliation, the outgoing US President, Donald Trump, announced the dismissal of the director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency over a statement he described as “extremely inaccurate” regarding election security. President Trump has not provided any evidence for this accusation.

Donald John Trump is the 45th and current president of the United States. He entered the 2016 presidential race as a Republican and was elected in a surprise electoral college victory over Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton while losing the popular vote. Trump lost the 2020 presidential election to Democratic nominee Joe Biden.

The outgoing President announced Tuesday evening that he had fired Christopher Krebs, the government official in charge of ensuring the security of elections.

Earlier, Krebs had rejected allegations from President Trump regarding “widespread” voter fraud in the elections that he lost to Democratic rival, Joe Biden.

Mr. Trump tweeted:

“The recent statement by Chris Krebs on the security of the 2020 Election was highly inaccurate, in that there were massive improprieties and fraud – including dead people voting, Poll Watchers not allowed into polling locations, ‘glitches’ in the voting machines which changed votes from Trump to Biden, late voting, and many more.”

“Therefore,” Trump added, “effective immediately, Chris Krebs has been terminated as Director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency.” Twitter quickly placed a warning sign on this tweet, questioning the veracity of the information it provided.

Krebs has managed the Department of Homeland Security’s Cyber ​​and Infrastructure Security Agency since its inception two years ago. His dismissal was not a surprise, even to Krebs himself.

Reuters reported last week that Krebs was aware that his efforts to expose disinformation about “fraud” in the elections would cost him his post, and that he had informed his aides his expectations of his dismissal.

In response, Krebs tweeted: “Honored to serve. We did it right. Defend Today, Secure Tomorrow.”

Statements Reject Fraud Allegations

It is noteworthy that the agency supervised by Krebs issued a joint statement last week with other local and federal government agencies responsible for election security. The joint statement read:

“The November 3rd election was the most secure in American history. Right now, across the country, election officials are reviewing and double checking the entire election process prior to finalizing the result.”

Christopher Cox Krebs is an American attorney who served as the Director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency in the United States Department of Homeland Security from November 2018 to November 2020.

The executive committee of the Election Infrastructure Government Coordinating Council and the Election Infrastructure Sector Coordinating Council also said in a joint statement Thursday, “there is no evidence that any voting system deleted or lost votes, changed votes, or was in any way compromised.”

Despite the sweeping victory for Biden, the outgoing President refuses to acknowledge his defeat, clinging to his claims it is unjustified. It is a blatant break with American political tradition.

Trump’s Campaign Faltered

In the absence of any evidence to justify the fraud accusations, three lawyers representing President Trump’s re-election campaign asked to withdraw from the lawsuit filed in this regard in Pennsylvania.

The judge authorized the withdrawal of attorneys John Scott and Douglas Brian Hughes, but decided to keep Linda Kearns, with a new attorney appointed to represent the campaign. Gina Ellis, the legal advisor to the Trump campaign, played down the implications of this development, calling it a “routine change.”

Trump’s campaign centers on the claim that voters were allowed to amend rejected ballot papers due to technical errors, such as the lack of a “confidentiality envelope.” However, until this moment, the campaign’s efforts were still fiascoed, to push the courts to cancel the counting results or to postpone the announcement of the results in key states.

On Monday, the Wisconsin Election Commission said a recount would cost about $7.9 million, a sum the Trump campaign would have to pay in advance if it requested a recount.

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Joyce Davis

My history goes back to 2002 and I  worked as a reporter, interviewer, news editor, copy editor, managing editor, newsletter founder, almanac profiler, and news radio broadcaster.

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