Trump Pushes Venezuela’s Maduro to the Wall, Slams the Country with Fresh Sanctions

  • The US president elaborated that he had come up with the decision "in light of the continued usurpation of power by the illegitimate regime of Nicolás Maduro and his collaborators."
  • The Trump administration did not detail in its executive order what assets Venezuela held in the United States and are consequently affected by the measure.
  • The Trump administration has also imposed sanctions against about a hundred people, and entities linked to the Maduro led Government, in addition to restricting the gold trade of the oil nation.

It is now even more evident that the push by the US to have Venezuela’s President Nicholas Maduro vacate office is still actively on. In the most recent move to frustrate Maduro’s administration, US President Donald Trump has imposed a total blockade on the state assets of the Venezuela government in the US. The move by Trump is most likely aimed at imposing a future total embargo on Venezuela. Before Venezuela’s inclusion on the list, the blockade of state assets in the US was only effective on; Cuba, Syria, Iran, and North Korea.

Nicolás Maduro (born 23 November 1962) is a Venezuelan politician serving as president of Venezuela since 2013, with his presidency being disputed with Juan Guaidó since January 2019

“All assets and interests in assets of the Government of Venezuela that are in the United States are henceforth blocked and cannot be transferred, paid, exported, withdrawn or negotiated with in any other way,” Trump said in an Executive Order which has already been put into effect.

Juan Guaidó (born 28 July 1983) is a Venezuelan politician, a member of the social-democratic Popular Will party, federal deputy to the National Assembly representing the state of Vargas, and currently serves as the President of the National Assembly of Venezuela since 5 January, 2019. On January 23, 2019, Guaido and the National Assembly declared he was acting President of Venezuela, receiving recognition of legitimacy by almost 60 governments worldwide, and starting the 2019 Venezuelan presidential crisis by challenging Nicolás Maduro’s presidency.

The US president elaborated that he had come up with the decision “in light of the continued usurpation of power by the illegitimate regime of Nicolás Maduro and his collaborators.” In addition, Trump accused the Maduro regime of “human rights abuses,” “interference against freedom of expression” and “the Maduro camp’s undermining of the authority” of opposition leader Juan Guaidó, whom the US considers the legitimate president of Venezuela.

The Wall Street Journal quoted a government official saying that the measure is aimed at imposing an “embargo” against Venezuela. The Trump administration did not detail in its executive order what assets Venezuela held in the United States and are consequently affected by the measure. The main Venezuelan state asset in the United States, the oil company Citgo, has been blocked since January following the sanctions imposed by the Trump administration against Petróleos de Venezuela (PDVSA). In addition to depriving Maduro and PDVSA of the control of Citgo, the Trump recognized a new board of directors appointed by the Venezuelan National Assembly (AN, Parliament), which is under the leadership of Guaidó.

Since Washington recognized Guaido as the interim president of Venezuela in January, the Trump administration has also imposed sanctions against about a hundred people, and entities linked to the Maduro led Government, in addition to restricting the gold trade of the oil nation.

This Tuesday, the so-called International Conference for Democracy in Venezuela takes place in Lima, in which the National Security Advisor of the White House and one of Washington’s main strategists on Venezuela, John Bolton, will participate as a speaker.

Only $1/click

Submit Your Ad Here

Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

Leave a Reply