Trump Tweets U.S. “Locked and Loaded” After Saudi Attacks

  • The Houthi rebels in Yemen claimed responsibility for the attacks, but Secretary of State Pompeo blames Iran.
  • "There is reason to believe that we know the culprit, are locked and loaded depending on verification," Trump tweeted.
  • Following the attacks, business analysts are concerned that oil price is set to sky-rocket in markets around the world.

Though President Trump did not openly state whom he believes is the perpetrator of the heinous attack on the Saudi Arabia oil plants, his top diplomat, Mike Pompeo, has since Saturday asserted that the attack was carried out from Iran, and not Yemen, as the world was initially made to believe. Trump tweeted Sunday he was “locked and loaded depending on verification.”

On September 14, two Saudi Aramco plants were attacked by drones. Houthi movement (Houthi rebels in Yemen) have claimed responsibility for the attacks. The attack cut 5.7 million barrels per day (bpd) of Saudi crude output which is over 5 percent of the world’s supply.

Earlier, the Yemeni Houthi terror group had claimed responsibility for the attack and made the whole world to believe so. On his part, Secretary of State Pompeo is of a contrary opinion, and strongly opposed to the narrative that Yemen’s Houthi rebels were behind Saturday’s attacks on Saudi Arabia.

The targets of Saturday’s attacks were two oil plants in the city of Bukajk (Abqaiq) and Khurai (Khurais) in the east of the oil-rich kingdom. There were two fires that were under control, but the production and export of Saudi crude oil suffered a major blow. The Aramco refinery in Bukajk is the largest oil processing plant in the world. It is estimated that it produces up to 7 million barrels of oil on a daily basis. It has been the target of attacks many times in the past, including by the terror group, Al-Qaeda, whose suicide bombers made a failed attack on it, way back in February 2006.

Mohammad bin Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud (colloquially known as MBS) is the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia and Deputy Prime Minister.

Shortly after the Saturday attack, the Houthi rebels from Yemen, supported by Iran, claimed responsibility. They reported that they had sent ten drones for the attack and warned that the attacks against Saudi Arabia would be even more dangerous if the war in Yemen— in which the Saudis are leading the war against them— continued.  However, Secretary Pompeo accused Iran of the attack. “We call on all nations to publicly and unequivocally condemn Iran’s attacks,” he said. “The United States will work with our partners and allies to ensure that energy markets remain well supplied, and Iran is held accountable for its aggression,” Pompeo added.

On Saturday, President Trump also referred to the attack on Twitter, but did not specify who Washington thinks is the perpetrator. “There is reason to believe that we know the culprit, are locked and loaded depending on verification, but are waiting to hear from the Kingdom as to who they believe was the cause of this attack, and under what terms we would proceed,” President Trump tweeted.

Following the attacks, business analysts are concerned that oil price is set to sky-rocket in markets around the world. As reported by Prince Mohammad bin Salman, the attacks on the two installations resulted in the “temporary” suspension of operations in both plants. The Saudi Ministry of Energy estimated that production of 5.7 million barrels of oil per day, or about 50 percent, was halted, following the unfortunante attacks.

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Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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