Turkey Indicts Six More Saudis in Khashoggi Murder

  • The indicted Saudis are however not in Turkey and they hence would be tried in absentia.
  • On July 3, an Istanbul court started the trial in absentia of 20 other Saudis indicted for their alleged involvement in the journalist’s death.
  • Khashoggi’s death gave rise to one of the most serious diplomatic crises in Saudi Arabia.

An Istanbul prosecutor on Monday indicted six new Saudis suspected of having had a hand in the dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi’s 2018 brutal murder. The prosecutor asked for a life sentence for two of the suspects involved and five years for the remaining four defendants.

Turkish prosecutors filed on Monday a second indictment against six Saudi suspects over the 2018 killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi in Turkey.

They are accused of being involved in the brutal murder and subsequent dismemberment of the journalist’s body at the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on October 2, 2018.

The indictment of the six Saudis comes a few days before the second anniversary of the murder of the popular journalist. The indicted Saudis are, however, not in Turkey, and they hence would be tried in absentia.

On July 3, an Istanbul court started the trial in absentia of 20 other Saudis indicted for their alleged involvement in the journalist’s death. They include two suspects close to Saudi Arabia’s Crown Prince, Mohammad Bin Salman.

Turkish investigators identified the pair as the masterminds of the crime: Saoud al-Qahtani, a former adviser to the Crown Prince, and General Gen. Ahmed al-Assiri, a former number two of the Saudi intelligence services.

Khashoggi, a contributor to the Washington Post and a confidant turned foe of the Saudi was murdered and his body dismembered in October 2018 at the Saudi Arabian consulate in Istanbul, where he had gone to retrieve a document in preparation for his wedding to his Turkish fiancee. He was 59 years old, and his remains were never found.

Khashoggi’s death gave rise to one of the most serious diplomatic crises in Saudi Arabia, and degraded the image of the Crown Prince, known as MBS. Turkey and the United States identified MBS as the main killer. The UN also accused the Crown Prince of key involvement in the murder of the journalist. 

UN: Saudi crown prince suspect in Khashoggi murder case.

Agnes Callamard, the UN Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary killings said thus:

“Under international human rights law, the killing of Mr. Khashoggi was an extrajudicial execution for which the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia should be held responsible.” She added, “this case demands an investigation into the chain of command to identify the masterminds, as well as those who incited, allowed or turned a blind eye to the murder, such as the Crown Prince.”

After denying the murder, and putting forward several versions of the facts, Riyadh said the murder was committed by Saudi agents who acted without being ordered by their superiors.

Following an opaque trial in Saudi Arabia, five Saudis were sentenced to death in December and three others were sentenced to prison terms for the murder with a total of 11 people indicted.

In early September, a Riyadh court overturned its final death sentence verdict and sentenced the five sentenced to 20 years in prison, and three others to between seven and 10 years in prison.

This verdict came after Jamal Khashoggi’s children decided in May to grant their pardon to the perpetrators of the heinous crime.

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Vincent otegno

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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