Typhoon Goni — Death Toll Rises to 20

  • Typhoon Goni has destroyed tens of thousands of homes in the Philippines.
  • Philippine civil protection services accounted for more than 20,000 homes destroyed and another 58,000 that were partially damaged.
  • Typhoon Goni, which formed in the Pacific Ocean, was described by meteorologists as the strongest typhoon this year.

In the Philippines, authorities announced that the number of people killed by the deadly Typhoon Goni has risen to 20. The typhoon is considered the strongest this year, and it has left a trail of destruction in that archipelago. Communications with the areas affected by the weather remain cut off.

Power lines have been brought down by the storm

Accompanied by strong wind, with gusts in the order of 225 kilometers per hour and torrential rains, Typhoon Goni has destroyed tens of thousands of homes in the Philippines, damaged electrical and telecommunications networks, and caused landslides.

The island province of Catanduanes, and the province of Albay, on the island of Luzon, the largest and most populous in the Philippines, were the areas most affected by the extreme weather conditions that hit the country on Sunday.

In Albay province alone, Ten people, including a five-year-old, were reported to have been killed as a result of the typhoon. Two drowned, another was swept away by volcanic mud and another killed by a falling tree.

In the Guinobatan municipality, also in Albay province, Representative Zaldy Co of the Ako Bicol party list told Reuters that more than 300 houses were buried under volcanic debris. The typhoon, which followed a trajectory in direction west, lost intensity when it reached the Manila metropolitan area before progressing in the South China Sea in the direction of Vietnam.

“We are horrified by the devastation caused by this typhoon in many areas including Catanduanes island and Albay,” Philippines Red Cross chief Richard Gordon said in a statement.

“Up to 90 percent of homes have been badly damaged or destroyed in some areas. This typhoon has smashed into people’s lives and livelihoods on top of the relentless physical, emotional and economic toll of Covid-19,” he added.

A man gazes at floodwaters inundating Daraga in the Philippines after typhoon Goni struck.

Philippine civil protection services accounted for more than 20,000 homes destroyed and another 58,000 that were partially damaged. Several agricultural areas have also suffered significant damage.

Before the typhoon passed, hundreds of thousands of people were evacuated from risk areas. The head of disaster prevention services in the province of Albay, Cedric Daep, stressed that:

“Thousands of people could have died” if the authorities had not triggered this evacuation plan. We have extensive damage to infrastructure and housing. Many people are hungry. They had already suffered from Covid due to the loss of jobs and dislocation. Some don’t even have kitchen utensils.”

Typhoon Goni, which formed in the Pacific Ocean, was described by meteorologists as the strongest typhoon this year, and ranked first in the category of “super typhoon.”

The Philippines is affected annually, on average, by two dozen tropical storms and typhoons, which destroy crops, fragile homes and infrastructure, keeping entire populations in permanent poverty.

The worst in recent history, in 2013, was super typhoon Haiyan, which killed more than 7,300 people, particularly in the central city of Tacloban, which was submerged by giant waves.

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Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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