UAE Delays Hope Probe Launch to Mars

  • The UAE first announced plans for the mission in 2014.
  • At present, there is no exact date for the launch of the mission.
  • the main purpose for the mission is to search for a connection between the current Martian weather and the ancient climate of Mars.

On July 15th, 2020, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) announced a delay of the Mars Hope Probe lunch. The UAE Space Agency (UAESA) released the information via Twitter. The delay comes after the UAESA’s discussions with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. The launch was scheduled at the Tanegashima Island, Japan.

Tanegashima is one of the Ōsumi Islands belonging to Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. The island, 444.99 km² in area, is the second largest of the Ōsumi Islands, and has a population of 33,000 people. Access to the island is by ferry, or by air to New Tanegashima Airport. The Tanegashima Space Center is the largest rocket-launch complex in Japan with a total area of about 9.7 square kilometers. It is located on the southeast coast of Tanegashima, an island approximately 40 kilometres south of Kyushu.

The United Arab Emirates Space Agency (UAESA) is an agency of the United Arab Emirates government responsible for the development of the country’s space industry. It was created in 2014 and is responsible for developing, fostering and regulating a sustainable and world-class space sector in the UAE.

The UAE first announced plans for the mission in 2014, as part of the program for the development of the economy, in the field of technology and science. The Hope probe was built by the Mohammed bin Rashid Space Center, in collaboration with two research institutes in the US, the University of Colorado and Arizona State University.

In addition to the United Arab Emirates, the United States and China are also planning to send spacecraft to Mars this month. The US and Russia both have plans to colonize the Moon, and eventually, Mars.

At present, there is no exact date for the launch of the mission. The new launch time will be announced soon, according to a statement on Twitter. The UAE emphasizes that the window for launching will last until August 3, but they hope for this month.

The Hope probe was due to launch from the Japanese Tanegashima Space Center for a seven-month journey to the red planet, where it will enter orbit and send data on the Martian atmosphere to Earth. However, storm clouds that gathered around the launch station delayed the mission.

The Emirates Mars Mission is a planned space exploration mission to Mars set to launch the Hope orbiter on 16 July 2020. It was built by the Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre, an Emirati space organization, as well as the University of Colorado Boulder, Arizona State University, and the University of California, Berkeley.

The UAE mission will be the first interplanetary launch of an Arab country and will create a global weather map of Mars. Hope probe is a small, unmanned spacecraft weighing approximately 1.5 tons, which would be the weight of an average mid size vehicle. It is also equipped with a modern weather satellite.

According to the Mohammed bin Rashid Space Center, the main purpose for the mission is to search for a connection between the current Martian weather and the ancient climate of Mars. Geophysical data suggests that Mars was once a much warmer and wetter world, with liquid water on its surface.

Additionally, Hope prove will study  the mechanisms that drove oxygen and hydrogen out of the Martian atmosphere. It is believed that the loss of the Martian atmosphere is the main reason for the transformation of Mars into a cold desert, in which water can only exist as steam or ice.

It is also going to map the global image of how the Martian atmosphere changes over the course of the day, season, and year. The current available data only provides information about temperature and climate for a short period of time on Mars.

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Christina Kitova

I spent most of my professional life in finance, insurance risk management litigation.

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