Uganda — Museveni Reelected President, Kyagulanyi Rejects Outcome

  • The candidate of the National Unity Platform (NUP) and popular politician in the country, Robert Kyagulanyi, better known as Bobi Wine, came second with 34.83% of the votes.
  • Nicholas Opiyo, a renowned Ugandan human rights defender, said that "these elections have not been free or fair."
  • The president of the local Electoral Commission, Simon Byabakama, however rejected the accusations of fraud.

Uganda ‘s incumbent President, Yoweri Museveni has been declared the winner of the presidential elections held last Thursday with 58.64% of the votes, according to the results announced this Saturday by the local Electoral Commission. The election was marked with violence and accusations of fraud.

Posters line streets of Uganda during election.

As per the results announced by the local electoral body, the candidate of the National Unity Platform (NUP) and popular politician in the country, Robert Kyagulanyi, better known as Bobi Wine, came second with 34.83% of the votes. 

”Worst Electoral Fraud”

The opposition has however dismissed the released figures as having been cooked in favor of the incumbent, Yoweri Museveni.

On Friday, the opposition dismissed the results terming them “the worst electoral fraud in the history of the East African nation.” The campaigns were marred with cases of opposition harassment and intimidation and during the election time, access to the Internet was blocked in the entire country.

Museveni, 76, in power since 1986 and leader of the ruling National Resistance Movement (NRM), was seeking his sixth re-election in the elections. Bobi Wine insisted that Ugandans had voted for him “en masse to change a dictatorship for a democracy” and that he will fight for “the will of the people” through all possible legal channels, including protest. 

The president of the local Electoral Commission, Simon Byabakama, however rejected the accusations of fraud from Wine and asked him to show evidence, to which the politician replied that he will do so when the Internet is restored.

Nicholas Opiyo, a renowned Ugandan human rights defender, said that “these elections have not been free or fair”, due to the hundreds of arrests of opposition supporters, violence against journalists while doing their work or the high military and police presence in the streets. All of this makes, in Opiyo’s opinion, these are “the worst elections Uganda has seen in a long time”.

Musician-turned-politician Robert Kyagulanyi, also known as Bobi Wine, speaks during a press conference at his home in Magere, Uganda, on January 15, 2021.

Military Storms Kyagulanyi’s Home.

On Friday as Bobi wine planned to address the media to explain his upcoming initiatives, dozens of soldiers surrounded his house.

The military presence at his home continues to date and the press and members of his party have been prevented from accessing it.

Wine is not under arrest, according to the Ugandan Police spokesman Fred Enanga, who assures that the uniformed men who are guarding Wine’s house do so “for the candidate’s own safety.”

One of the Army spokespersons, Colonel Deo Akiiki, stated that, due to Wine’s special status as a presidential candidate, they must reinforce his security. 

Wine, 38, began his political career in 2017 and soon became one of the most critical voices of the government with a revolutionary speech. The politician has been arrested on multiple occasions.

Last November the security forces killed at least 54 people after using live ammunition to disperse hundreds of Ugandans who, in different parts of the country, protested in the streets against a new arrest of the flamboyant politician. For his part, President Museveni does not hesitate to describe Wine as a Puppet of western nations who should be shunned by Ugandans.

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Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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