US — EU Sanction Russian Government Officials Over the Arrest of Alexei Navalny

  • The EU claims that these leaders are responsible for serious rights violations such as arbitrary arrests, systematic repression against peaceful demonstrations, and against freedom of expression and opinion.
  • “We reiterate our call for the Russian government to immediately and unconditionally release Mr. Navalny.”
  • At the end of January, Biden had a telephone conversation with his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, in which he discussed the extension of the New START nuclear disarmament agreement and called for Navalny's release, according to the report released by the White House.

The United States and the European Union jointly announced on Tuesday sanctions against senior Russian government officials in the case of opposition leader Alexei Navalny, who was arrested and jailed upon arrival in Moscow in January after being poisoned last year and seeking treatment in Germany.

U.S. Matches EU, U.K. Sanctions on Russia for Navalny Attack.

The entry into force of the sanctions represents the first round of measures by the Joe Biden government against the Kremlin and the first imposed within the framework of the new regime for violations of EU Human Rights, a new instrument to respond to flagrant violations of rights globally.

Specifically, the European Union imposed measures against the head of the Investigation Committee, Alexander Bastrykin, the Russian attorney general, Igor Krasnov, the head of the National Guard, Viktor Zolotov, and the director of Prisons, Alexander Kalashnikov.

The EU claims that these leaders are responsible for serious rights violations such as arbitrary arrests, systematic repression against peaceful demonstrations, and against freedom of expression and opinion.

The sanctions consist of the freezing of assets in the EU and the prohibition of entry to the countries of the bloc and are effective only a week after the Foreign Affairs Council gave the green light.

In turn, the US government indicated that it has reports confirming “with great confidence” that Navalny, who was hospitalized in a coma for more than two weeks in a clinic in Germany, was poisoned by agents of the Russian intelligence service (FSB) with Novichok chemical agent.

“The United States has consistently characterized the legal offensive against Mr. Navalny as politically motivated, an assessment shared by our G7 partners, and the European Commission of human rights,” a senior administration official said. “We reiterate our call for the Russian government to immediately and unconditionally release Mr. Navalny.”

The E.U. at first took action against Russia in October of last year over it’s perceived role in the poisoning Navalny, restricting travel and freezing the assets of six Russians and designating one entity.

“We’re in many ways catching up to the E.U. and the U.K.,” a senior administration official said, noting that some of the individuals sanctioned by the U.S. had previously been designated by the E.U. “This is making sure we’re all on the same page now.”

Officials described the U.S. moves as designed to send a signal to Russia that such actions will have severe consequences.

At the end of January, Biden had a telephone conversation with his Russian counterpart, Vladimir Putin, in which he discussed the extension of the New START nuclear disarmament agreement and called for Navalny’s release, according to the report released by the White House.

Hours before the joint announcement, the Kremlin had warned that any new US sanctions on the opposition’s treatment would not achieve its goal and would only worsen already strained relations.

Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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