US Sanctions on Venezuela Undermines Rights of Most Vulnerable, UN Warns

  • The United States announced the blocking of Venezuelan property and property in the United States three days ago.
  • Former Chilean President Ms. Bachele has previously criticized US sanctions against Venezuela.
  • The United States has imposed extensive sanctions on Venezuela over the past few years, including the boycott of state-owned oil company PDVS, which owns the Citigo Oil Refinery in the United States.

UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet has criticized the new US sanctions against Venezuela, calling it aggravating to the suffering of millions of its citizens. The new sanctions will hurt the most vulnerable in Venezuela, according to Ms. Bashela.

Michelle Bachelet (born 29 September 1951) is a Chilean politician who served as President of Chile from 2006 to 2010 and again from 2014 to 2018, the first woman to occupy the position. After leaving the presidency in 2010 and while not immediately reelectable, she was appointed the first executive director of the newly created United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women).

“The sanctions are extremely broad and fail to contain sufficient measures to mitigate their impact on the most vulnerable sectors of the population,” Ms. Bashela said in a statement. The United States announced the blocking of Venezuelan property and property in the United States three days ago by imposing new sanctions on Nicolas Maduro’s government and banning any trade with the government.

The United States and more than five other countries are calling for Nicolas Maduro’s resignation and the replacement of Parliament Speaker Juan Guido. Despite the exclusion of food, medicine, and clothing, the new sanctions are such that the situation is likely to worsen for millions of Venezuelans, she said.

Former Chilean President Ms. Bachele has previously criticized US sanctions against Venezuela. She has also criticized human rights abuses by Nicolas Maduro’s government. Michelle Bachelet cited the Venezuelan government in March as a good example of the role of ‘civil and political rights’ in accelerating the deterioration of economic conditions.

The new round of sanctions, while confiscating all the assets of Venezuelan government and officials in the US, prohibits any financial and transaction transactions with the country. It is the latest US punitive action against the government of Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, which Washington has insisted on stepping down.

The United States, Canada, the European Union, and more than five opposition leaders recognize Juan Guaido as the interim president of Venezuela, but China, Russia, Turkey, Iran, and several other countries have backed Nicolas Maduro’s government with strong support.

Venezuela is a country on the northern coast of South America, consisting of a continental landmass and a large number of small islands and islets in the Caribbean Sea. The capital and largest urban agglomeration is the city of Caracas. It has a territorial extension of 916,445 km2 (353,841 sq mi). The country has extremely high biodiversity and is ranked seventh in the world’s list of nations with the most number of species. There are habitats ranging from the Andes Mountains in the west to the Amazon basin rain-forest in the south via extensive llanos plains, the Caribbean coast and the Orinoco River Delta in the east.

The United States has imposed extensive sanctions on Venezuela over the past few years, including the boycott of state-owned oil company PDVS, which owns the Citigo Oil Refinery in the United States.

Washington has also boycotted Nicolas Maduro and a number of his aides. As such, US companies and citizens are not allowed to trade with Mr. Maduro and his allies. Venezuelan Foreign Minister Jorge Ariza, like his Iranian counterpart Mohammad Javad Zarif, has been sanctioned by Donald Trump administration.

According to a ruling signed by Mr. Trump on Tuesday (August 6th), “all Venezuelan government property and assets that are inside American territory are blocked and are not allowed to be bought, sold, moved or moved outside the country.”

The ruling also sanctions any financial transactions with Venezuelan officials.

This means that not only the personal and public assets of Mr. Maduro and his cabinet members have been frozen inside US territory, but any financial dealings between him and the Venezuelan government outside the country have also been sanctioned by the United States.

Venezuela is in a similar position to Cuba, Iran, North Korea, and Syria in terms of banking and financial sanctions. White House National Security Adviser John Bolton co-authored the US-led sanctions against “anyone who supports the Maduro government.”

The sanctions, he said, will give others the message they must choose between trading with the US or Venezuela. Mr. Bolton said the United States would use “any means to bring an end to dictatorship in Venezuela.”

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Benedict Kasigara

I have been working as a freelance editor/writer since 2006. My specialist subject is film and television having worked for over 10 years from 2005 during which time I was the editor of the BFI Film and Television.

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