Venezuela’s Maduro to Skip UN General Assembly in New York

  • Venezuela will hand over to the UN Secretary General a petition signed by some 12 million Venezuelans criticizing the economic sanctions imposed on Venezuela.
  • Maduro broke off diplomatic relations with the US following the country’s move to recognize Juan Guaido as the legitimate interim president of Venezuela.
  • The American Government under president Donald Trump accuses Maduro of corruption, human rights abuses, and of being in power illegally.

Nicolas Maduro, the President of Venezuela, announced that he would not go to New York during this years’ session of the UN General Assembly, in which leaders from around the world are expected to participate. The event is scheduled for September 23rd. Maduro, however, took part in last year’s event.

The United Nations General Assembly (UNGA or GA) is one of the six principal organs of the United Nations (UN), the only one in which all member nations have equal representation, and the main deliberative, policy-making, and representative organ of the UN. Its powers are to oversee the budget of the UN, appoint the non-permanent members to the Security Council, appoint the Secretary-General of the United Nations, receive reports from other parts of the UN, and make recommendations in the form of General Assembly Resolutions.

The Venezuelan head of state said that Venezuela would be represented in this year’s event at the UN by his Vice President Delcy Rodriguez and Foreign Minister Jorge Arreaza. The two are set to hand over to the UN Secretary General, Mr. António Guterres, a petition signed by some 12 million Venezuelans criticizing the economic sanctions imposed on Venezuela by the administration of US President Donald Trump. “Their goal is to force me to resign from the office of president,” said Maduro. “Here is the immense majority of the Venezuelan people saying no more blockade, no more sanctions,” Maduro said in reference to the at least twelve million signatories of the petition that is set to be presented in the UN assembly meeting. The Venezuelan president was speaking while addressing the ruling socialist party’s youth wing.

At the beginning of the year, the already sour diplomatic relations between the US and Venezuela deteriorated even further. President Maduro broke off diplomatic relations with the US following the country’s move to recognize the head of the Venezuelan parliament, and opposition leader Juan Guaido, as the legitimate interim president of Venezuela. In turn, the US imposed sanctions on high ranking officials of the Maduro regime, as well as on state entities in a bid to force Maduro to step down as the country’s head of state.

“This year I will stay with you all working in Venezuela, safely and calmly,” Maduro assured his supporters at a rally in Caracas.
The American government, under president Donald Trump, accuses Maduro of corruption, human rights abuses, and of being in power illegally. The US. for some time now has been backing Juan Guaido’s bid to wrestle over power from Maduro and assume the country’s presidency.

During the 2019 Venezuelan presidential crisis concerning who is the legitimate President of Venezuela, reactions and responses to the crisis have been divided. As of July 12, the countries in blue have recognized Juan Guaidó as interim president. The countries in red support Nicolás Maduro.

Venezuela has been experiencing extreme political tensions for several months since Maduro began a new term as president of the country in January, after his election was not recognized by the opposition, and Guaido proclaimed himself interim president. So far, 50 countries, amongst them, the US have recognized Guaido as the rightful president of Venezuela. On his part, Maduro’s government is supported by, among others Russia, China, Cuba, Iran, and Turkey.

Since then, the political crisis in Venezuela has been escalating, and the country is experiencing an economic crisis that has led to much suffering of the common Venezuelan. The nation’s local currency has lost value and has got virtually no value currently. The state’s stores lack almost all essential products, and hyperinflation is estimated by the IMF at 10 million percent. According to the UN, seven million people in Venezuela which translates to a quarter of the country’s entire population need immediate humanitarian aid.

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Vincent Ferdinand

News reporting is my thing. My view of what is happening in our world is colored by my love of history and how the past influences events taking place in the present time.  I like reading politics and writing articles. It was said by Geoffrey C. Ward, "Journalism is merely history's first draft." Everyone who writes about what is happening today is indeed, writing a small part of our history.

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