World Pledges $1.8 Billion for Sudan Reconstruction

  • "This conference opened a new chapter in the cooperation between Sudan and the international community to rebuild the country."
  • "We expect our partners to support us to have a successful transition," Hamdouk said. “I do not want to paint a rosy picture."
  • The transitional government desperately needs foreign support.

Sudan received pledges of nearly $2 billion in aid, including €150 million from Germany, during an international conference hosted by Germany. The conference was aimed at supporting the transition process in a country that is under a debt burden, and suffering from a severe economic crisis.

Abdalla Hamdok is a public administrator who serves as the 15th Prime Minister of Sudan. Prior to his appointment, Hamdok served in numerous national and international administrative positions.

“This conference opened a new chapter in the cooperation between Sudan and the international community to rebuild the country,” German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said at the end of the organized conference via the Internet, sponsored by Germany, the European Union, the United Nations, and Sudan.

Officials participating in the conference said that the European Union pledged €312 million euros ($350.13 million), the United States provided $356.2 million, Germany €150 million, and France €100 million for various projects in Sudan.

“We expect our partners to support us to have a successful transition,” he said. “I do not want to paint a rosy picture. Any transition is messy and there are so many challenges,” Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok said.

With the assistance of the World Bank, one of the projects is planned cash transfers to poor families. Britain has pledged £150 million ($ 186.17 million), and the UAE has provided $300 million.

United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres called for “massive” aid, saying that the region needed a stable and democratic Sudan. Guterres did not provide a number, but the pledges made so far are much less than the $8 billion that Hamdok said in August that it was necessary to improve Sudan’s crisis. With the secession in 2011 of South Sudan, the Republic of the Sudan lost most of its oil production.

German Development Minister Gerd Muller praised the “massive efforts” of the transitional government “for peace, democracy and reforms.” The office of Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok said in a statement last Monday that the Sudan Partners Conference “aims to create partnerships between Sudan and the international community to achieve economic stability and advance development efforts and democratization.”

The World Bank is an international financial institution that provides loans and grants to the governments of poorer countries for the purpose of pursuing capital projects. The World Bank’s most recent stated goal is the reduction of poverty.

The transitional government desperately needs foreign support. It has been running the country under a power sharing agreement with the army since longtime dictator Omar al-Bashir was ousted in a popular uprising last year.

Hamdok warned that the absence of aid could lead to the spread of unrest in a volatile region in eastern and north-eastern Africa, and push young people to continue migrating by sea to Europe.

Sudan is suffering from a rise in its external debt, which amounts to about $60 billion, according to Prime Minister Hamdok. After the ouster of Bashir, the economic situation worsened, and the inflation rate reached 114% last May, according to government statistics. The value of the Sudanese pound also fell against the dollar.

In April 2019, the Sudanese army overthrew Bashir, who ruled the country with an iron fist for thirty years, following popular protests that lasted for months. Its main driver was the deteriorating economic situation.

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Joyce Davis

My history goes back to 2002 and I  worked as a reporter, interviewer, news editor, copy editor, managing editor, newsletter founder, almanac profiler, and news radio broadcaster.

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